Calling All Dads

There has been a considerable amount of outrage lately throughout the dad community, particularly the dad blogging community, over a label. In its “Who’s Minding the Kids?” report, the U.S. Census Bureau refers to stay-at-home dads as “child care,” even though those dads are obviously the primary care providers in the family. Essentially, babysitters. The report also lists moms as the “designated parent” if both a mom and dad exist in the household, or in single-parent homes. But dads, stay-at-home dads in particular, are not happy.

Of course, moms have been the traditional primary caregiver pretty much since the beginning of time. Over the past decade or so, a small shift has occurred and more dads are staying home with the kids. Still, we dads have a long way to go before we catch up in the child-care street-cred department.

But that’s not stopping involved dads from circulating a petition to put us on equal footing with moms when dads are the “designated parent.”  I signed the petition in solidarity with the dads I know and admire. Dads who stay at home and take care of the family. Or Dads who, like me, work but are active participants in the lives of their children.

I do, however, have news for all of these irritated dads, myself included: we are not the problem. In fact, I think we may be in the minority. The truth is, a lot of dads are fine with being called the babysitter. They call themselves that. And if their wives or girlfriends or whomever happen to need them to watch the brood for a finite amount of time, they roll their eyes, sigh deeply and grin and bear it. Again, THEY call it babysitting.

I recently took a day off from work to get our house in order – literally – after we returned from a Disney vacation. I performed the normal duties a stay-at-home parent might tackle any day. Meal preparation, school drop-off, food shopping, laundry, house cleaning. And it made me realize: I’d be damned if I’m the babysitter today. I shared my feelings with my Facebook community and was surprised that a lot of the moms who commented said I was the exception, not the rule. That not all dads are active and involved. That the men in their office constantly refer to spending time with their kids, without their wife, as “babysitting.” Some moms even said they don’t trust the dads with more than the basics, and for good reason.

A light bulb went on inside my head. Let’s face it: there are tons of guys out there who still pull the old ball-and-chain routine when referring to their significant others. There are too many guys out there who don’t cook, do laundry or give the kids a bath. There are even guys out there who would rather have a guys’ night out instead of a family movie night.

And those are the guys the Census report reflects. And no petition will change things until these guys get out of the dark ages, throw on an apron every now and then, roll up their sleeves and get some Play-Doh under their fingernails.

I am fortunate. I see involved dads every day in my life. Family members and friends. At work. At my daughter’s school. At dance class. But until the vocal minority becomes the majority, until these guys recognize being a father and being a dad are two totally different things, we will all be considered the babysitter. And you know what? Big deal.

Let’s drop the righteous indignation. Let’s realize who we’re really talking about. Let’s stop demanding respect from a government bureaucracy who decided on a silly label based on a survey of a measly 35,000 households. The only people I need respect from is my family. My wife and my little girl. And as long as they call me husband and dad, everyone else can call me whatever the hell they want.

A NEW PHENOMENON, THE STAY AT HOME DAD

“Stay at home dad” used to be an embarrassing phrase.  But, as more and more families cope with the rising cost of daycare and the high unemployment rate, more families are opting to leave egos aside and let the higher earner of the home stay at work while the other spouse brings in the money to support the family.  These days the high earner could just as easily be the mom, leaving the dad to take care of the kids, ad often there is no choice with the limited job market.

10 years ago how many dads were in the playground after school pick-up?  In my school playground, it is 25% stay at home dads vs. moms.  But, I have to subtract he nannies, they are the majority!

That is how it is in our house.  I lost my job several years ago.  Soon after our son entered Kindergarten, it was clear an after school program would not have worked for us so I stopped job hunting and officially became a stay at home dad.

I consider myself lucky, I get to spend more time with my son. As I observe other parents in the playground, most dads, albeit not all, seem to enjoy their new status, because they enjoy their time with their kids.  That is a great by-product of this new era..

For our son, he has the security of knowing his dad is taking care of him. Now that 2 years have passed, the homework load has increased, and the stay at home parent is best equipped to start that process before dinner while the child can still focus.  That process will only become more important as the child gets older.

But here is the other issue, the household.  Who cooks and who cleans? I get to go to the gym after school drop off, I get some time to myself during the day, but who does the cooking and cleaning?  My spouse gets home at 7:30 pm, so I do feel responsible to take care of the food in our house. I include the food shopping in that chore as well. Am I demeaned by this?  I think this is the heart of the stay at home dads dilemma.

Then there is the cleaning.  Do the husbands want to vacuum? Clean the bathroom?  I know I do not like that part of the job, but it has to be done.  I was in charge of that all summer long, I don’t feel demeaned, I just feel disgusted!  Luckily I found a cleaning lady to come once every 2 weeks, this is a luxury for our family, but I just don’t have the gene for cleaning, sorry ladies!  I do fill in the week in between the cleaning lady’s visits.

I do want to do my fair share, my spouse works a 10 hour day, it is my job to do whatever needs to be done, just like the olden days when the wife did all these jobs while the husband worked.  And I do get a couple of hours to myself, but I don’t watch soap operas!

Are we appreciated?  Sometimes I get the feeling that my work is less important.  But  this is the wife complaint!  I am not the wife!  The roles have changed and everybody has to be appreciated.  I pick up the kid at 2:40 p.m. and my work day then ends at 10 p.m. That is not meant as a complaint, it is just to illustrate that everyone’s jobs are important in the house.

So how’s your ego?  Do not act like your full time job that brings in an income is all that we need to run a family.  It is not.  I do everything else and get no credit based on the $0 income.  That is where the message needs to change.  Yes, I get a break for lunch, 1-2 hours a day, sometimes.  But I work all night and WEEKENDS!  Who feeds the family on Saturday and Sunday, who does that clean up?  Me.  I am not looking for extra credit; I am just looking for minimal recognition. And I am not looking to be judged by anyone, friends or family, who think now that I do not have an income, I am a bum. Our family made a choice to not put the child in an after school program, so I do not work, I take care of the family in what is a role reversal from the old days.

This is how it works for our family, what about yours?

www.gaynycdad.com

Respect Must Be Earned

Despite the fact that I have been successfully parenting my two children as a stay at home Dad for almost 2 years, I had been reduced in her tirade to a bumbling dumb man incapable of the parenting competence of a woman.

My wife had unexpectedly returned from her commute to work last week one morning. An overturned tractor trailer had made the road impassable prompting her to work from home rather than sit in unbearable traffic for several hours. Understandably, her stress laden experience had caused her to be irritable which was quite obvious from the tone of her voice. I listened to her vent, helped her get settled, and she began to work at her laptop. My 2 y.o. daughter, disrupted from her normal routine with just me, became incorrigible when her demand for attention was not being met to her satisfaction from her Mommy. Little did I realize these chain of events would unleash the perfect storm.

I was able to provide a proper distraction to free my wife to continue with her work day. Yet it did not end there. Instead I was treated to a barrage of harsh criticisms about every aspect of my parenting methodology. Despite the fact that I have been successfully parenting my two children as a stay at home Dad for almost 2 years, I had been reduced in her tirade to a bumbling dumb man incapable of the parenting competence of a woman. Yes, this misguided stereotype, to my surprise, was alive and well in my very own home. A minor heated exchange followed which produced fruitless results. I left in a huff with my daughter in tow to the playground. I did not want to further alter her routine.

The park, and the playground in particular, can be a wonderful place to think. While pushing my little girl on the swing I had the clarity of thought to realize my wife’s reaction was not completely her fault. Even though it is the 21st century, parenting remains in the eyes of the mainstream media the domain of women. Men, for the most part, are still being characterized as clueless dolts, comically stumbling their way through parenthood. Even articles that supposedly shed light on men’s roles as Stay at Home Dads instead are laced with outrageously foolish allegations such as the deconstruction of one’s manhood one diaper change at a time.

In my first post for DadRevolution aptly titled “The Revolution Begins from Within”, I wrote the following:

Overall, the parenting landscape has begun to shift dramatically towards an equal partnership between men and women.  A partnership in which men and women are not interchangeable in their roles as Fathers and Mothers, but rather complement each other in a concerted effort to provide the best upbringing for their children. 

Apparently, even at home, the revolution has just begun. I’m happy to report that my wife and I came to an understanding that it’s okay for our parenting styles to be different. We each play an important role in the lives of our children. We should build on each others strengths rather than waste energy trying to tear each other down. Challenging days lie ahead, but certainly not insurmountable. Over time, I believe men will garner the respect they deserve as parents. Every day’s an opportunity to earn it.

What do you think?

CuteMonster.comVincent Daly aka CuteMonsterDad is a graphic designer, writer, actor, artist and most importantly a husband and father. He is the founder of CuteMonster.com, a resource for Dads.

A little whining from the token SAHD

Juggling three kids is not an easy task and I want some respect for it damit. Now this isn’t going to be one of those “nobody respects the stay at home dad” whining sessions but I’m getting a little cranky with the judgements. Last night we were at the library for story time. They have this time where kids can come in their jammies and have a story, sing some songs, and play a game or two. It’s pretty cute really. Since I had had the boys all day, that being my job and all, I left them in the story circle with my wife and went to browse some books. I needed the break and Beautiful needed the time with the boys but the people around the circle gave me the head shake. I heard a “typical man” as I walked out into the stacks and it pissed me off.

I am used to the comments at the checkout stand when I come through with the boys and the checker comments that I must be giving mommy a break. Or when we head to the zoo and the ticket taker says it must be Daddy’s day out with the boys. It’s all part of a lack familiarity with any situation they don’t see on TV but my ability to smile and deflect is wearing down and I am starting to just amuse myself at their expense. I say that mommy left us for a carnie with small hands. We still can’t go back to the circus without so much pain. I told the guy at the Zoo that I wasn’t there of my own free will, they had taken me prisoner and would kill me if we didn’t see the elephants STAT. I once told a checker these weren’t my kids, I was trying to get the family discount and that lead to an awkward conversation with security so we don’t use that line anymore.

It’s sad really that me taking a break from being the primary care taker for the boys makes me look like every other dad at the library. Either they aren’t there at all, or they are sitting with a magazine waiting for the play time to end. I know that the fault lies mostly with the dads that make up the rule but for one of the exceptions it’s getting a little old.

Portland Dad writes over at Stay At Home Dad PDX about raising two boys as a stay at home dad. You can also find him on twitter as Portlanddad.

Even the Stay at home dads need balance

The Work/Life balance takes on a different meaning when your a stay at home dad. For us Work is the family and life seems to be a complete unknown to me. I am not finding a good balance right now for a couple of reasons I will try to illustrate.

When we started this blog there were three stay at home dads in the Revolution but now that the dust has settled a bit I find I am the only one still going. I feel like I need to stand strong and represent the cause in a sea of great working dads, but at the same time the numbers seem a bit more balanced. While there are more and more men staying at home to raise the kids, whether by choice or necessity, the numbers are still pretty low. So as one out of the ten dads here at DadRevoltion being a stay at home dad fits more in line with the country as a whole. So far you have read some posts on balancing kids and work or balancing kids and your spouse but as an at home dad that balance looks more like balancing kids with a life outside the house. So far I have to say I am failing at finding that balance but there are a couple of reasons for that.

First off from some of my previous posts you probably worked out that I live in Portland Oregon, but that hasn’t always been the case. I was born in Portland but grew up in Southern California. I moved back to Portland two and half years ago after living the previous five years in Indianapolis, Indiana. While living in Indy I was also a stay at home dad and finding that balance of kids and personal time was much easier. I had friends that I hung out with, community projects I was involved in, and plenty of sporting events and concerts to attend. Here in Portland I haven’t found those friends, time for the community involvement, or extra money for various entertainment options. I know that all of those things will come eventually but right now my free time is spent at home reading or on the computer instead of out of the house. That always being home starts to manifest in a feeling of being trapped or stuck. Those feeling build on each other and bleed into my interactions with the kids and with my wife and I am far less patient than I should be.

Adding another kid to the mix has played a big part as well. When we just had one, and a baby at that, it was much easier to get out and about with friends. Now with the two boys it becomes more work to go out with them, and a good deal of planning to find a way to leave them at home. I am also a lot more worn out from caring for my two boys plus the third little monster in the mix that I look after during the week. After a long day of running around with them, cleaning the latest art project, or coming up with three meals a day I don’t have a whole lot of metal energy to come up with something for me to do on my own. I feel like a lot of my creativity is taken up in the day to day tasks of raising the boys leaving me void of ideas for things to do myself. Trying to think of what to do is much harder then just not doing anything so apathy wins out and I pick up the computer instead of meeting a friend for coffee and conversation that doesn’t involve me asking anyone to take their hands off their penis.

When Beautiful comes home from work I don’t want to just clock out, slapping her hand on her way into the house noting that it is her turn to get into the ring and wrestle. I know you working dads know what I mean here, that transition is tough and as much as you want to get right in there and get your parenting on you need to shift gears and ease into it. I feel guilty turn the kids loose on my wife so I stick around too long instead of finding time in there for me. I need to be better at successfully making the hand off and then getting away, even once a week, to recharge. When every minute is about the kids I come to resent them for not having any time for me and that isn’t fair to them. They need me to get away and find more outlets to recharge as much I do. That balance will always be weighted far more in the direction of home but I need to be better about finding those times away that really are for me. Now I just need to come up with ideas for what those are.

Portland Dad writes over at Stay At Home Dad PDX about raising two boys as a stay at home dad. You can also find him on twitter as Portlanddad.

Sharing the love: Living Room Forts

Having grown up with a father that built high rises and suspension bridges I knew a thing or two about the proper way to build a fort and used a lot of those tricks yesterday. First we gathered lots of blankets, sending the boys to raid the guest rooms and linen closets for supplies.

Before heading out to the boat that would take us off shore we had to go over some safety issues first. How to get in and out of a basket for helicopter rescue and how to swing on a rope. Now I understood the basket rescue part, but didn’t know why maneuvering a rope swing was necessary for life out on the platform. Would we be swinging around like Tarzan from deck to deck? We made the thirty minute ride from the shore to the oil rig and while my dad slept on the deck I tried to ward of sea sickness in the back of the boat. We arrived and I quickly learned why we needed to know how to swing on the rope. To get from the boat to the platform in high seas we needed to grab up as high as possible when the boat was on top of a swell and then swing over to the deck. Grab too low and the boat crushes you against the frame of the platform. I grabbed up high on the rope, at the top of the swell and then started my swing over. For some reason I instinctively wrapped my legs around the rope, like it was tree swing at Culaby Lake. When it came time to let go on the other side my hands released and I slid down the rope taking a large knot square in the sack. I fell over with tears in my eyes from the stinging pain of my balls in throat. At the safety meeting the job foreman asked who the kid was that rang his chimes getting off the boat and I raised my hand as he thanked me for making he week.

After that rough start I settled in to working with my iron worker dad. This was not the first structure we had worked on together but it was by far the biggest and most complicated. Building with my dad has always been something I have enjoyed and am eager to enjoy with my boys. Yesterday the boys and I worked on our biggest project to date, a living room fort. Having grown up with a father that built high rises and suspension bridges I knew a thing or two about the proper way to build a fort and used a lot of those tricks yesterday.

First we gathered lots of blankets, sending the boys to raid the guest rooms and linen closets for supplies. Then we moved the chairs around the living room to create a nice solid skeleton for the structure. I was shouting out order and calling the kids terrible names so they would get the feel of a real job site. I feel it’s part of my job to give them the full experience.

We ended up with a long fort along the banister that had two entrances. There was a tunnel on one end that only the little guys could get in and a bigger entrance in the back that daddy could squeeze into. It was surprisingly spacious inside and with the smaller pillows and blankets from the kid’s beds, a comfortable space. We spent most of the afternoon in the fort and Primo decided he would nap there instead of his bed. We kept the fort up all day until this morning and brought the laptop in to watch the basketball game. After bath time mommy read the boys book in the fort and we had to draw the line at sleeping there for the night. I could tell that they loved this time as much as I had when building forts with my dad and none of us got tagged in the junk for our troubles.

Planning our first camping trip AB (After Baby)

Although Michigan has beautiful parks and places for camping, there are two factors which make camping not so enjoyable for me: unpredictable weather (more work for me) and black flies (unreal how much they love to chew on me). However, I’m always eager to score points with my lovely wife so I am currently working on planning our descent into hell, er…um our a camping trip.

My wife loves camping and has been bugging me to plan a camping trip for the three of us. Let’s just say I don’t share her excitement. I used to love camping, but as I have gotten older it has become more reminiscent of work than relaxation. I blame this partly on the fact I worked for a residential treatment center where taking delinquent kids camping was part of my job. I left that job shortly after the last fiasco of a camping excursion which involved a combination of marijuana, fake injuries and a near mutiny.

Although Michigan has beautiful parks and places for camping, there are two factors which make camping not so enjoyable for me: unpredictable weather (more work for me) and black flies (unreal how much they love to chew on me).

However, I’m always eager to score points with my lovely wife so I am currently working on planning our descent into hell, er…um our a camping trip.

In a way this could be cool, because I have to basically buy all new equipment. (I gave away most of our camping equipment to some homeless guys I was interviewing for a project. Seriously, I did.) I’m also kind of excited to take Tessa camping. Mostly because I can use her as an excuse to buy the elaborate gear I plan on getting in exchange for agreeing to do this.

Here’s my shopping list for the 3 main items which I believe will be essential for a pleasurable camping vacation:

Tent: With all the crap gear we will need for Tessa, we will need lots of room.

Below is the tent I want:

From Cabela’s, it’s the Coleman Legacy Weathermaster for $240. (It has a LED tent lighting system with a USB port in the light system power unit can recharge cell phones and music player…waterproof floors, self-rolling windows)

NICE, right!?!

However, I know this is more realistic:

This is the Eagle’s Camp Family Voyager Tent for $99 It’s okay, but no LCD light, USB ports or other things that I might actually enjoy and get pleasure out of having.

I really liked that little section in the tent above where I can put my chair and hide from the black flies.

Camp stove:

I have no chance in hell of getting this but it is so awesome. This is the Camp Chef Deluxe Oven with Grill. It’s only $280, but comes with a top burner (7,500-BTU); oven (3,000-BTU), and the top grill has a 5,000-BTU output. Includes thermometer and two oven racks. Matchless ignitor burners. I can cook, so imagine the gourmet I could put together. I’ve done pretty well with much less and it will likely remain that way.

Like I said, no chance in hell.

(Even Hell, Michigan where we might be camping 🙂


I’ll probably get this:

Remember all the gear and crap we’ll need. That’s why this will have to do. It folds up so it will be easy to pack into the back of our Prius. Oh yeah, forgot to mention that little nugget. We have one car, a Prius. I had a Blazer until we moved to Lansing, but since we were both working within a few miles of our house, my wife suggested I sell it. Yep, that’s my story.

It’s times like this when I miss that Blazer.

Finally, and this item is non-negotiable:

So what were your experiences camping with your baby? Any “gear” you would recommend? Any you would suggest leaving home? Please share your thoughts. I’m going to need all the help I can get (And in help, I mean actual help – not beer).

Being a stay-at-home dad in Lansing

Yet despite the five or six-month long winter, (thank God it’s over & who the hell remembers when it starts any more) and the bi-weekly, week-long disappearance of the sun, Tessa and I made it through largely unscathed. This is in large part due to two fantastic places to take your young infant and toddler: Babies and Books at the Foster Library and Impression 5 Science Center.

I’ve been a stay-at-home dad (SAHD) for exactly 13 months (as of today). While I don’t feel that deserves any sort of special recognition or honor, I do think that being a SAHD here in Lansing, MI, should earn me something. And sorry, your pity isn’t nearly enough. Yet despite the five or six-month long winter, (thank God it’s over & who the hell remembers when it starts any more) and the bi-weekly, week-long disappearance of the sun, Tessa and I made it through largely unscathed. This is in large part due to two fantastic places to take your young infant and toddler: Babies and Books at the Foster Library and Impression 5 Science Center.

Babies and Books is a free program put on for babies (6 months to 18 months) and their parents. The program goes for an hour. (Yes, an hour. I wouldn’t have believed it either). The group leader, a very energetic and enthusiastic Ms. Linda, is one of the jewels of the city. She’s amazing. I was so impressed and excited to find this program, I wrote the Capital Area District Library and gave them props for having such an awesome program:

As a stay at home dad with an infant daughter, there are not many places in the community holding organized activities specifically for babies/toddlers and their parents. I signed us up for the Babies and Books program at the Foster Library, and love it! I recommend it to all my friends who have babies. Linda does an amazing job each week of engaging the kids for almost an hour! As the only dad in the group at the time, Linda made me feel really welcome and I appreciated that very much as well. Great job, CADL! (CADL put it on their website).

Here’s a recent pic from Babies and Books:

The Impression 5 Science Center is another incredible place to take your infant and/or toddler. Although much of the center is geared towards preschool and elementary aged children, they also have what they call their First Impressions Room. This room is meant for children ages 0 – 4 and their parents. There are lots of great toys to play with and even a padded area for the really little babies. The room also has a full play kitchen, a giant water table, a slide and tunnel and a really nice story area. We bought a membership here (I can’t remember and it’s not on their site, but I believe it was $50 or $60 – well worth it). Tessa really enjoys coming here, and now she’s enrolled in I5’s Little Learners Kitchen Science Program. It’s a five-week program geared towards 1 and 2 year olds to introduce them to science. My wife (huge science nerd) takes her on Saturdays. It’s a great chance for Mommy and Tessa to have fun.

Here’s Tessa enjoying herself at I5:

These activities got us through the winter here in Lansing. Now with spring and summer upon us, we can hit Potter Park Zoo, Hawk Island Park and the Tin Can. Oops, that last one is for me only. However, I do recall reading somewhere about a dad who took his daughter to a bar…hmmm, there’s no longer smoking in Michigan restaurants and bars. I’ll let you know. At the very least, it might make for a great blog post and might even get me on CNN.

Fathers Should Have A Voice in Today’s Society

As a father I am challenged daily and continually am learning about myself, as well as about patience, remaining calm in all situations and staying strong even through challenging situations.

I wanted to take a moment to introduce myself. My name is Chris, better known as Dad of Divas.

As a father I am challenged daily and continually am learning about myself, as well as about patience, remaining calm in all situations and staying strong even through challenging situations.

About 2.5 years ago I started my blog (Dad of Divas) to talk about the experiences that I was having as a father as well as provide my thoughts on products and such with people that would be interested. Since then, my blog has continued to grow and I am tying new things and expanding into new horizons each day.

I was excited about getting asked to be a part of the DadRevolution as in the past 2.5 years since I started blogging I have become more and more amazed at the great examples of fatherhood that are out there! Too many times you hear the horror stories of fatherhood and not the ones that make a difference, and I hope that I can shed some light on one father who is just trying to do that…make a difference in my own girls’ lives.

I believe that fathers should have a voice that companies should want to hear. As you will come to hear from some of the other Revolutionaries, being a Stay-at-Home Dad (SAHD) is becoming more and more common and as fathers we too are buying and making decisions for the household, but many companies only cater certain decisions to us, and many times these decisions fall into the purchasing of alcoholic beverages and electronics. This needs to change!

I also believe that it is time for Dads to stand up and let people know what makes us tick. It is not always  the media portrayed picture of the beer drinking, sports loving, woman lusting man, but instead, men who are doing what they can to balance their lives and to be engaged with their families in all types of ways.

It is time for guys to stand up and say enough is enough and to let the world hear that as fathers we are planning to make a difference in not only our childrens’ lives but in the community and world around us!

Let the DadRevolution begin!

Dad Revolution: A fatherhood manifesto

No matter our differences in geography, ages, the number of children we have or whether we are WAHD, SAHD, single dads, adoptive dads, etc… We are simply dads united in solidarity based on one principle: We love being fathers, and want to share this love with the world.

April 4 of 2009 was all at once the happiest, most exciting and anxiety-producing day of my life.

It was the happiest because I got to fall in love instantly with my beautiful daughter Tessa.

It was the most exciting because I waited nine months to finally meet her, hold her and tell her how much I love her.

It was the most anxiety-producing because now that Tessa was here, I was a father for real now. I was a first-time father a month away from my 37th birthday. I was also a first-time father that was going to be a stay-at-home dad. Most scary though was that I was a first-time father who wasn’t really confident he was cut out to be a good father.

When I started my dad blog, Stay At Home Dad in Lansing, this past December, my original intention was to write a living testimonial about my life as a new father and stay-at-home dad. I didn’t really have an audience in mind so much as I was doing it more for my daughter Tessa than anyone else. However, I never expected the added bonus of finding the positive and supportive online community of dads that I have found in the ‘daddy blogger’ community. I didn’t expect to see not only the high number of dad blogs out there (even in relation to the huge number of mom blogs), but also the high quality of content I found in reading dad blogs. This inspired me to do more than share my own parenting story, but to also try to showcase and support other dad bloggers as well through my weekly Dad Blog reviews.

I’ve been impressed by this online brotherhood of dads who have supported each other no matter our differences in geography, ages, the number of children we have or whether we are WAHD, SAHD, single dads, adoptive dads, etc… What stands out so much in the dad blogger community is the comraderie and solidarity we show simply as dads united by one common bond: We love being fathers, and want to share this love with the world.

I’m really pleased to be part of the Dad Revolution, and excited to see what comes of this project. I’d like to think of the work of this ‘revolution’ and the fourteen dad bloggers featured on this site as a new fathering manifesto. As part of a new generation of dads, we are striving to redefine the “traditional” and antiquated approaches of our own fathers, grandfathers and so on. Due to our own sense of self-entitlement and male privilege, fathers have stood comfortably on the outside looking in for far too long. I hope you will join us as the members of the Dad Revolution share their stories about what fatherhood means to them.